Paris-based medtech startup FeetMe raises €9.4 million to build out its movement analysis platform

feetme-team

100 million people worldwide suffer from gait disorders. Gait disorders are often a forerunner and indicator of evolutive diseases and health status: multiple sclerosis, Parkinson disease, fragility among elderly, peripheral neuropathies and diabetic foot problems.

Paris-based FeetMe‘s technology allows for the analysis of gait and posture, by combining pressure sensors, motion sensors and learning algorithms to analyse patients’ functional capacity, as well as empower rehabilitation among sufferers of gait disorders. FeetMe is building what it says is the world’s first real-world disease diagnostics, monitoring and rehabilitation platform based on movement data.

The startup, which produces smart wearables in addition to providing digital health services, has raised €9.4 million in Series A funding. The investment round was led by LBO France, with additional investment from existing investors Kurma Diagnostics, the fund Paris Saclay seed fund, Idinvest Partners, Seventure and SOSV.

“Our platform has demonstrated it can generate unique insights and real-world evidence to accelerate clinical research at scale, and our FeetMe Evaluation solution is setting a new standard for long-term continuous mobility assessment of patients with gait disorders,” said Alexis Mathieu, founder and CEO at FeetMe. “This Series A round will help FeetMe to accelerate commercial activities.”

“With its disruptive yet technically validated technology, FeetMe establishes itself as the global leader in long-term continuous mobility assessment, with the potential to improve diagnosis for the millions of patients each year who present with known and unknown walking difficulties,” said Philippe Chambon, venture partner at LBO France. “I believe that FeetMe, with its vast technology capabilities, has the ability to create the world’s largest and highest quality gait pattern data set to create a variety of new digital biomarkers across disease areas.”